Category Archives: Dolly Worling

The Legend of Tucker Holland

c 2019 by Jan MacKell Collins

Portions of this article are excerpted from Brothels, Bordellos & Bad Girls: Prostitution in Colorado 1860-1930.

           No doubt about it, Tucker Holland had it bad for Dolly Worling. The 24-year-old thought nothing of spending his time and money on the soiled dove of Colorado City’s red light district west of Colorado Springs. In fact, for a good six months leading up to Tucker’s death, his love for Dolly had turned from mere infatuation into downright obsession.

            It was said Tucker was a good boy, residing in Colorado Springs and holding a steady job. But the enticement of Colorado City was his undoing. Tucker and his brother Tony were frequent visitors to the red light district, and both boys had a fondness for Dolly’s house of ill fame, The Cottage.

            On the night of  January 18, 1908, Tucker and Tony were out buying sandwiches for the Cottage girls when Dolly’s ex-husband, Frank Shank, arrived. Frank was a foul mouthed bartender, but his love for Dolly was undying. The couple had been trying to reconcile for some time. Dolly’s love for Frank and Tucker had become precariously balanced, tilting in favor of Frank whenever the boisterous man darkened her door. When Tucker returned with the sandwiches, he discovered he’d been unceremoniously ousted from Dolly’s house. Employee Nettie Crawford met him at the door. Instructions to find somewhere else to sleep were accompanied by a pile of Tucker’s clothes.

            Crestfallen Tucker went away, muttering to Tony, “This is the end of me.” The following morning, the brothers were once more received at Dolly’s house. Tucker and Dolly retired to her boudoir, where Tucker sat on the bed and played with a revolver. Dolly stood at the window making light of Tucker’s intentions as she listened to him declare his love for her. Outside, a small boy on the sidewalk below was pointing his toy pistol at Dolly’s dog. Dolly joked, “See, Tucker, he’s going to shoot my poodle!”

            But Tucker Holland was in no mood for jokes. “Well, here’s another,” he replied. A second later a shot rang out as Tucker shot himself in the head.

            Dolly screamed, and the other girls rushed into the room. Dolly’s cook, Birdie Ward, took the gun from Tucker’s dying hand and laid it on the dresser. Dolly grabbed the gun and turned it on herself, exclaiming, “If he’s dead, I must die too!” Her girls succeeded in wrestling the gun away from her, and Tony summoned the police.

            When authorities arrived, they found Tucker bleeding profusely as he lay across Dolly’s bed. The pistol was on the dresser, but the police had a hard time swallowing the story of why it was there. Each occupant of the house was immediately arrested, including customer Roy Catton. Tucker was bundled off to St. Francis Hospital, where he died at 3 p.m. He never recovered sufficiently enough to make a statement.

            An inquest following the shooting included questioning of Tony Holland, Nettie Crawford and Birdie Ward, as well as prostitutes Mary Catlin and Myrtle Van Duyne. Frank Shank was questioned, but mostly spewed forth epithets for answers. Dolly also was questioned. The inquiry concluded that Tucker Holland had indeed ended his own life.

            Tucker was buried at Evergreen Cemetery, and his untimely death inspired the city authorities in Colorado City to close the brothels. The prostitutes of Colorado City were accordingly given ten days to leave town. Where Dolly Worley went is unknown, but her baggage certainly contained the memory of the boy who loved her—and lost.